The Pointe

MidPointe Library's Official Blog

Local History #tbt - Kids Will Be Kids

Kids never change.

That message comes through loud and clear while perusing the 800+ photos of early 20th century Monroe, Ohio, in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection.

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Made available by the Monroe Historical Society, the massive collection of black-and-white photographs taken by Monroe businessman Marion G. Warner (1861-1922) is now available for viewing on MidPointe’s Digital Archives  (http://www.midpointedigitalarchives.org/digital/). It can also be seen on a 70-inch interactive touch screen at MidPointe’s Middletown location, where a set of enlarged photos is also on display.
Kids are well-represented in Mr. Warner’s photos, derived from individual glass plate negatives. The images reflect almost every aspect of life in the 1900s, 1910s and 1920s -- so different yet so familiar to today. They include:


Schoolchildren accompanied by an adult, presumably a teacher or principal :Photograph of children in front of the Monroe Consolidated School building, Monroe, Ohio, undated


Children accompanied by pets : Photograph of an unknown boy playing Cowboys and Indians by a white tent, 1916 June 18, photograph 1

A First Communion or Confirmation class at the Church of Our Lady of Seven Dolors :Photograph of the 1910 Church of Our Lady of Seven Dolors confirmation class, Monroe, Ohio, 1910 Aug

Posing with the older generation :Photograph of three generations of four women, and a young boy, 1914, photograph 2

Of course, playing in the dirt :Photograph of an unknown young boy playing in the dirt, undated, photograph 1

Or all dressed up for a ride with no pony in sight :Photograph of two unknown boys sitting atop a pony cart, undated

While the majority of buildings in the Warner collection have been identified, most of the people have not been identified, said Adam Wanter, MidPointe’s Digital and Special Collections archivist. Therefore MidPointe Library is seeking the public’s assistance in identifying the unknowns.

If you can identify people or places in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection or would like to correct items that have been misidentified please contact the library at  https://www.midpointelibrary.org/page/contact-form

Don't Let the Kids Have All the Fun!

What do you get when you combine SUMMER + READING + INTERESTING PROGRAMS + LIVE MUSIC?

The 2018 MidPointe Library Summer Reading Program, of course! The popular program for kids, teens and adults runs June 1 through July 31 at each MidPointe location.

A decades-long tradition, “Summer Reading” encourages adults 18 and older (as well as birth to age 18) to visit their nearest MidPointe Library, check out books and-or audiobooks and keep track of their reading or listening on paper or online. Prizes will be awarded for effort. A grand prize drawing will take place.

No doubt many of the adults who participate will remember taking part in Summer Reading when they were kids.

Because this year’s program is themed “Libraries Rock!” organizers have heeded the call and added live music to the traditional mix of Summer Reading activities.

The result? A series of six free, family-friendly live music concerts to be presented throughout June and July among the four MidPointe locations.

The series will offer a little bit of everything from jazz to bluegrass and country. No doubt a few “golden oldies” will inspire memories and sing-alongs among the Baby Boomers in the audience.

Summer Reading fun doesn’t end with books and music, however. MidPointe locations will also host guests and programs of interest to all ages. Adults are invited to stop by and create a bookmark, join a summer book chat, listen to a health expert, color their stress away, watch a film, learn about the Great Apes (plus other topics) and lots more. Check out the MidPointe events website for for adult, kids and teen activities.

Individuals can sign up for Summer Reading anytime between June 1 and July 31 by obtaining a reading log at any MidPointe location or by logging on to  http://www.midpointelibrary.org/

MidPointe’s Summer Reading music concerts will be presented:

  • Sunday, June 10, 2-3:30 p.m. @ MidPointe West Chester Community Room A/B. Performers: Rich Nesbitt and the Metro City All Stars. Genre: oldies, R&B and blues.

  • Wednesday, June 20, 7:30-8:30 p.m. @ MidPointe Trenton lawn (Community Room if inclement weather). Performers: Paradise Crossing. Genre: classic rock, country.

  • Thursday, June 21, 6-6:45 p.m. @ MidPointe Monroe front lawn.  Tony Hale and Blackwater. Genre: bluegrass.

  • Thursday, June 28, 6:30-8 p.m. @ MidPointe Middletown Community Room.  Performers: HR Nightmare acoustic guitar duo. Genre: 70s, 80s, 90s hits.    

  • Thursday, July 12, 7:30-8:30 p.m. @ MidPointe Trenton lawn. (Community Room if inclement weather). Performer: Samuel Day and band. Genre: Christian rock, dance pop.

  • Wednesday, July 18, 7-8:30 p.m. @ MidPointe Trenton lawn. Performers: Just Friends Jazz Quartet (Jeff Slinker, Roger Bowman and Edgewood band directors Nick Fields and Jon Arnold). Genre: traditional jazz in the styles of swing, bebop, bossa nova, Latin, ballads, blues.

All Summer Reading events will be posted on the MidPointe Library events website: www.midpointelibrary.evanced.info/signup.

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P.S. MidPointe Library has a generous collection of books about rock’n’roll, the artists who bring it to life and the instruments they play. Why not check a few out and count them toward your Summer Reading tally? You’ll find a “rock collection” in our adult, young adult and juvenile departments. Just remember : “Libraries Rock!”

Local History #tbt - Fashions in the Early 20th Century

How does one dress for a special occasion in early 20th century Monroe, Ohio?

If you’re a woman, very carefully. Your hat, while lovely, is big and a little cumbersome. Your beautiful dress reaches to your ankles. Beware of puddles...and steps.

If you’re male, your bowler hat declares “I’m a serious man” while your straw hat shouts “I’m a fun-loving guy!” Only your hatter knows for sure.

And if you’re a kid, you wear anything Mother decides -- after you’ve been bathed, of course.

The fashions of America in the early 20th century are on full display in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection, a black-and-white retrospective of life in Monroe, Ohio, in the early 1900s, 1910s and 1920s.

Captured by Monroe resident and businessman Marion G. Warner (1861-1922), the collection’s remarkably sharp black-and-white images depict families, individuals of all ages, animals, homes, businesses, buildings, churches and many outdoor scenes.

The collection can be viewed on the MidPointe Library Digital Archives at http://www.midpointedigitalarchives.org/digital/.

It also appears on a 70-inch interactive touchscreen at MidPointe’s Middletown location, 125 S. Broad St. Enlarged photos from the collection are displayed at Middletown.

So travel back in time to the Monroe of Great-Great-Grandmother’s Day:

If you’re heading out in the morning, a bath is a must…

Photograph of an unknown baby in a wash bowl on a chair, 1913 May, photograph 1

Remember that a sharp-dressed man always makes a good impression (men in beards and sunglasses will sing about this decades from now).

Photograph of an unknown boy in a hat, undated, photograph 1

Everyone knows a straw “boater” hat and bow tie are the must-haves of a crooner...

Photograph of a dapper young man in a suit and straw boater hat, undated, photograph 1

...while a “bowler” projects a serious image a’la Inspector Lestrade.

Photograph of an unknown man in a mustache and bowler

Going to a fancy affair always requires a special dress…

Photograph of an unknown young woman in a white dress, undated, photograph 1

but the real fashion statement is your hat -- be it dark and serious...

Photograph of an unknown woman wearing a large, decorative hat, undated, photograph 3

light and whimsical…

Photograph of an unknown woman in a hat, holding a newspaper or magazine, 1910 September 27

or Early Flying Nun (a tip of the hat to TV comedy. What is TV, you ask?)...

Photograph of an unknown young woman in a white dress and large black hat

The Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection was originally curated by and has been made available to the library courtesy of the Monroe Historical Society which recently celebrated its 50th year of operation, said Adam Wanter, MidPointe’s Digital and Special Collections archivist. The city of Monroe celebrated its 200th anniversary last year.

For access to actual photographs, contact the Monroe Historical Society : http://monroeohhistoricalsociety.org/.


Can you help?  If you can identify people or places in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection or would like to correct items that have been misidentified please contact the library at  https://www.midpointelibrary.org/page/contact-form

Local Author Profile - Ken Mercurio

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Monroe, Ohio, resident, former Californian and biking enthusiast Ken Mercurio had no idea that someday he would write an inspirational book that would give hope to victims of accident and misfortune -- let alone one based on his own experience at the age of 56.

 

But a snapped bicycle fork changed all that.

 

Mercurio is the author of “Head over Wheels : A ‘Lucky Stiff’ Turns Tragedy Into a Cycling Triumph,” a compelling and conversational account of the 2007 biking accident that broke his neck and other bones but didn’t destroy his goal of riding in the prestigious and daunting Blue Ridge Parkway Bike Tour (Virginia and North Carolina) nine months later.

 

Mercurio recounts the fateful accident that occurred during a training ride (the “Simi Ride”) in California. Traveling at 28 mph, his bike “fork” (which he describes in his book as “the front of the frame that attaches to either side of the front wheel axle”) suddenly snapped apart, plunging him onto his head and breaking his neck and six other bones.

 

He suffered “pulverized neck vertebrae,” prompting his neurosurgeon to claim it was a miracle he didn’t die or become quadriplegic. Five vertebrae were surgically fused to save his life, leaving him with a permanently stiff neck and almost no ability to turn his head.

 

Throughout his book Mercurio credits medical care, the constant and loving support of family and friends and divine intervention for his recovery. While he didn’t get to ride his bike very far that momentous day, Mercurio writes in his Prologue: “...I think I traveled beyond where I could have ever imagined, straight into the hands of God…”

 

Other factors played a role in his recovery: Mercurio’s gratitude (for “the positives about my survival, recovery, and my life in general”) and his can-do attitude (“If Greg LeMond could recover from a near-death shotgun accidental shooting to win his second and third Tours de France, surely I could recover and ride the Blue Ridge Parkway”).

 

In the end, Mercurio’s support systems triumphed. He achieved his goal of participating in the Blue Ridge Parkway Ride, considered one of the country’s most difficult bike tours. In the book he calls it “the symbol of my recovery.”

 

Retired and recovering, Mercurio wanted to explain to family and friends just how the accident occurred and how he recovered. He didn’t plan to author an inspirational book for the public.

 

But the more he wrote, “the more I found that I was describing events and thoughts in the form of a book for not only acquaintances, but the general public…Finally, I also realized...that if I actually did complete my goal, my story could be inspirational to others.”

 

Mercurio considered self-publishing and contacting new, established publishers. Ultimately, “Head Over Wheels…” was published in 2014 by Sunbury Press of Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.

 

The written word has played an important role throughout Mercurio’s life and career.

 

As the nutritionist and regulatory director for Nestle USA in Glendale, California, his group was responsible for producing the technical part of food labels: nutrition facts, ingredients, net weights and claims such as Lite, Low Fat, No Cholesterol.

 

Prior to labeling and regulatory, Mercurio was the nutritionist for both Nestle and Carnation Company (Nestle bought Carnation in 1985), providing technical assistance to marketing, communications, public relations, consumer affairs and product development. He also wrote nutrition and regulatory articles that were published in a variety of food-industry and company publications as well as trade magazines.

 

Writing wasn’t limited to Mercurio’s career, however. He wrote news and feature articles for his local newspaper when he was director of a youth track and field program. He was sports editor of his high school newspaper, then became its editor-in-chief. He wrote articles about his school’s football, basketball and track teams for his local paper.

 

And don’t forget to add letter-writing to his resume.

 

As 1969 Senior Class President of Hawthorne High School (near the L.A. Airport), Mercurio will be remembered by classmates for having written the invitation that resulted in the highly improbable : the Beach Boys entertaining at their senior prom.

 

He recalls that :

 

“....our prom was ‘suffering’ a backlash from classmates who objected to our having, for the first time, a dinner dance instead of just a dance. There were calls to boycott it. Yikes! It was too late to back out of our contract with the Beverly Hilton Hotel. What were we going to do?....

 

“....Someone made a joke about getting the Beach Boys, who had gone to HHS…. I decided, What the heck? Nothing to lose by asking. I told my family what I was going to do, and my mom (without my asking) handed me an outline of how she thought I should ask, such as ‘We could never afford to pay the Boys, but thought they might want to do it for the publicity, and they might get a real kick out of returning to their alma mater.’

 

“I obtained the name and mailing address of their manager, to whom the letter was addressed, from my Beach Boys link: my best friend's brother was best friends with a guy whose brother was friends with Al Jardine. I do not have a copy of the letter...

 

“I think I mainly talked about how much the Boys were admired by HHS students, and we always told people we attend the school of the Beach Boys, blah blah, blah...

 

“What a pleasant shock to get a phone call from the (Beach Boys’) manager saying YES!” Mercurio continues. Luckily, the call came while Mercurio, as student  editor-in-chief, was editing the latest newspaper just prior to publication.

 

“I persuaded the print shop guy to let me write a new banner headline and front-page article to replace what he had already typeset. He was pretty excited by the news, too, so he agreed, and right there on the spot, I completely re-did the front page of the newspaper. When the paper came out the next day, it was truly ‘breaking news’ to the entire school…”

 

The prom sold out.

 

On the big night a different band played prior to the Beach Boys. Then it was showtime.

 

“We all loved their performance,” Mercurio fondly recalls of the future rock icons whose distinctive harmonies and lyrics celebrate West Coast fun, sun, surf and romance.

 

“It was not any different from any Beach Boys concert,” he recollects, “except that after about five or six songs, Dennis, Carl, and Al (Brian did not perform in concert any longer, so he was not there) started shouting out, asking about teachers they had had, and saying how Mr. So and So told me I was a loser and would never amount to anything. We all laughed at those little outbursts.

 

“There was very little dancing by us during the concert; we all stood facing the stage….When the Boys were done, the prom was over and we all went home. Quite a memory!”

 

There is a footnote to the story, however:

 

Mercurio recalls : “What's funny is, I later heard via my Beach Boys link that all my BS had no effect on the decision to accept my invitation; rather, it had all to do with the manager ‘forcing’ the Boys to do it because their popularity happened to be at a low point and they needed the publicity. The word was the Boys did not want to do it but were forced to do it…

 

“I'm glad I learned this only many months after the prom, not before it!

 

Information in this blog was obtained from Mercurio’s book, “Head Over Wheels, a ‘Lucky Stiff Turns Tragedy Into a Cycling Triumph,” available at MidPointe Library, as well as written communication from the author.

Local History #tbt - Finding Fun in the Early 20th Century

Everyone enjoys a bit of fun now and then.

Monroe, Ohio, residents in the early 20th century found interesting ways to spend their free time as illustrated in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection available on MidPointe Library’s Digital Archives http://www.midpointedigitalarchives.org/digital/ . The photos are also featured in a special exhibit at MidPointe’s Middletown location.

The collection was originally curated by and made available to MidPointe Library by the Monroe Historical Society.

Many recreational scenes are among the 800-plus black-and-white photographs taken by Mr. Warner (1861-1922), a Monroe resident, businessman and artist as well as amateur photographer. He derived the images from glass plate negatives.

Like many of us today, people in the early 1900s, 1910s and 1920s enjoyed a variety of free-time pursuits:

For instance, some people were real social climbers. To see how high a group would literally climb, check out the photo of the “six unknown women sitting in a tree” (undated). Note the ladder at the bottom of the photo. Photograph of six unknown women sitting in a tree, undated

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A popular recreation was croquet : Photograph of two unknown boys playing croquet, undated, photograph 1

Folks also enjoyed a good old game of baseball. This photo shows a game in progress in a field on Great Miami Pike (now Cincinnati-Dayton Road):

Photograph of a baseball game, Monroe, Ohio, 1910, photograph 1

Of course, the Warner collection wouldn’t be complete without a baseball card-style pose by this unknown player:

Photograph of an unknown man in a baseball uniform, undated, photograph 1

At the end of the day, reuniting with family appeared to be #1 on the recreational list. Mr. Warner took many photographs of families large and small, known and unknown. Study this photo and maybe you’ll recognize an ancestor or two :

Photograph of a very large, unknown, multigenerational family, taken on a wooden porch, against a backdrop of sheets hung on a wall of a house, 1913 August 5, photograph 1

Along with recreational pursuits, the Warner collection includes numerous categories of photos : buildings, churches, homes and houses, people and families, businesses, street views, bridges.

In addition to the digital presentation, the collection appears as a photographic exhibit on a 70-inch interactive touchscreen in the Local History and Genealogy Gallery at MidPointe Middletown. Enlarged prints of the photos are also displayed. The library is located at 125 S. Broad Street.

For access to actual photographs, contact the Monroe Historical Society : http://monroeohhistoricalsociety.org/.

Can you help?  If you can identify people or places in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection or would like to correct items that have been misidentified please contact

the library at  https://www.midpointelibrary.org/page/contact-form

Recognizing School Nurses Day and a Local Hero

Today is National School Nurse Day.

Therefore we commemorate Carol J. Henry, the first school nurse for the Madison School District whose selfless spirit was tragically cut short in 1998. Her sudden death at age 58 stunned that close-knit community but endeared her memory forever to family, friends, her church and an entire school system.

National School Nurse Day was created by the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) to acknowledge the contributions school nurses make every day to improve the safety, health and academic success of all students, a spokeswoman said.

Carol’s contributions to her calling and community were recounted in the book, “Middletown Women - Profiles of Women who made a Difference in the Community.” The book was published several years ago by the Middletown Branch of the American Association of University Women.

Carol died not far from her home in Madison Township one September morning in 1998 when her vehicle was struck by another, according to an article in the Cincinnati Enquirer. Reportedly she was on her way to one of the district schools.

Then-Madison High School Principal Robert “Bud” Bierly was quoted in the article : “Carol was one of the most loved people in this district.”

A wife, mother and grandmother, Carol seemed destined to serve her fellow man. According to her obituary in the Enquirer, she graduated in 1958 from Middletown High School and in 1961 from the Middletown Hospital School of Nursing. In 1978 she was a member of the first graduating class of Miami University’s bachelor of science in nursing program.

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Carol’s interest in nursing was apparent early on. In high school she was member of the Nightingale Club for future nurses, appearing with fellow club officers in a photograph in the 1958 Middletown High School yearbook, the “Optimist.”

According to the AAUW book, “in 1974 Carol became the first school nurse for the Madison School District.” The Enquirer reported that Carol became “the Madison Local School District’s only school nurse, rotating among the district’s three buildings. For 24 years she handled emergencies, kept immunization records and knew most students by name…”

According to the AAUW book, Carol also met the  challenge of becoming an EMT (emergency medical technician) with the newly formed Madison Life Squad in 1980. She later became a training officer for the squad, “combining her teaching skills with her health-care knowledge.”

The AAUW book described Carol’s “enthusiasm for life” as “apparent in all she did. Her love for the Lord manifested itself in her desire to be involved in the community, church and the lives of all those she loved...”

For example, the book reported, the birth of her first grandson in 1990 motivated Carol to establish a day care center at the Spring Hill Church of Christ where she had been a member since childhood. “This project combined her loves of family, community service, education and safety for children. Her physical stamina was tested by 12 hour days as she ran the center before and after her full days as school nurse,” it said.

The AAUW book continued : “Carol counted the days until her planned retirement at the end of the 1998-99 school year. She looked forward to spending time with her four grandsons and traveling with her brothers and sisters. Her husband, Darrel, retired from AK Steel and they were beginning to plan their ‘Golden Years’...

“Though her life was cut short, Carol Henry made a strong impact on the lives of the many she served in the schools, in the hospital, and in the community...Her joyful song is sorely missed by many,” the book concluded.
 

Sources:

“Middletown Women - Profiles of women who made a difference in the community” (available in the Ohio Room at MidPointe Library’s Middletown location).

Cincinnati Enquirer, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1998.

Local History #tbt - Day to Day Business in the Early 20th Century

If you think it’s tough to find a parking space these days, imagine what it was like for a horse carriage driver in early 20th century Monroe, Ohio.

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That scene is one of more than 800 depicted in the Marion G. Warner Photo Collection on the MidPointe Library website (Photograph of Pike Street, Monroe, Ohio, 1909 December 28)

The black-and-white image illustrates just how challenging it was to park one’s horse-and-buggy in a crowded business district populated by similar means of transport.  Has anything really changed?

The buggy photo was taken by Monroe businessman and artist, Marion G. Warner (1861-1922). Mr. Warner’s exceptionally sharp images -- each derived from a glass plate negative -- depict families, individuals of all ages, animals, homes, businesses, buildings, churches and many outdoor scenes from Monroe in the 1900s, 1910s and 1920s.

One way to appreciate the look of Monroe commerce in the early 20th century is to type the name, Pike Street (present day Main Street), in the search box of the Warner Collection website. In addition to the aforementioned photo you’ll discover photos of Mr. Warner’s general store (look for the horse-and-buggy to the right) and other businesses. Photograph of M. G. Warner General Store, Pike Street and High Street, Monroe, Ohio, 1909 December 28

By typing the phrase, Gas Main Installation, you’ll find photos of the installation of a gas main and sidewalks along what was Main Street (present day Old Street) in 1909. Photograph of gas main installation, Monroe, Ohio, 1909 August, photograph 2

Perhaps the most important take-away of Mr. Warner’s photos is the realization that as years pass the needs of daily life, business and public utilities remain basically unchanged. The following photographs also illustrate that reality:

Photograph of J. H. Sigg Grocer, Pike Street, Monroe, Ohio, 1913, photograph 1

Photograph of food delivery to C. M. Robinson Groceries and Hardware, Pike Street, Monroe, Ohio, 1913 March 5, photograph 2

The Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection was originally curated by and made available to MidPointe Library by the Monroe Historical Society. It can be accessed at http://www.midpointedigitalarchives.org/digital/

Online visitors can click on the category of photo they wish to see : buildings, churches, homes and houses, people and families, business, street views, bridges or browse the entire collection.

In addition to a digital presentation, the Warner collection appears as a photographic exhibit on a 70-inch interactive touchscreen in the MidPointe Middletown Local History and Genealogy Gallery. Enlarged prints of the photos are also displayed. The library is located at 125 S. Broad Street.

For access to actual photographs, contact the Monroe Historical Society : http://monroeohhistoricalsociety.org/.

Can you help?  If you can identify people or places in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection or would like to correct items that have been misidentified please contact the library at  https://www.midpointelibrary.org/page/contact-form

 

 

 

 

 

Local History #tbt - Winter Scenes in the Marion G. Warner Collection

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Perhaps the most beautiful scenes captured by early 20th century amateur photographer Marion G. Warner depict his hometown of Monroe, Ohio, blanketed in snow.

His winter scenes are among the 800-plus photos in the Marion G. Warner Photo Collection originally curated by and made available to MidPointe Library by the Monroe Historical Society.

Mr. Warner’s exceptionally sharp black-and-white images -- each derived from a glass plate negative -- depict families, individuals of all ages, animals, homes, businesses, buildings, churches and many outdoor scenes from Monroe in the 1900s, 1910s and 1920s.

With an artist’s eye, Mr. Warner (1861-1922), a Monroe  businessman, produced winter scenes that are reminiscent of Currier and Ives prints. Interestingly, his photos illustrate that life in Monroe in the early 1900s is remarkably similar to today.

Among his many winter scenes are : 
 

Photograph of a snow shoveling group, Monroe, Ohio, 1918 January 18

 

Photograph of an unknown baby in a stroller in the snow, 1914 December 17

Eighteen children outside a building on a snowy day

 

Photographs of children posing with sleds, Monroe, Ohio, circa 1910, photograph 2

 

Photograph of an unknown farm and man with dog, Monroe, Ohio, 1910 February 9, photograph 1

Photograph of South Street and Conover Farm, Monroe, Ohio, 1918 January 18

Photograph of a horse-and-buggy ride to the Church of Our Lady of Seven Dolors, Monroe, Ohio, 1914 February 25, photograph 1

Photograph of Center Street looking east, Monroe, Ohio, with Sun (or Moon?) directly behind church steeple 1910 February 18, photograph 4

 

The Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection can be accessed at http://www.midpointedigitalarchives.org/digital/. Online visitors can click on the category of photo they wish to see : buildings, churches, homes and houses, people and families, business, street views, bridges or browse the entire collection.

At MidPointe Library Middletown, the Warner collection appears as a photographic exhibit on a 70-inch interactive touchscreen in its Local History and Genealogy Gallery. Enlarged prints of the photos are also displayed. The library is located at 125 S. Broad Street.

For access to actual photographs, contact the Monroe Historical Society : http://monroeohhistoricalsociety.org/.

Can you help?  If you can identify people or places in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection or would like to correct items that have been misidentified please contact the library at  https://www.midpointelibrary.org/page/contact-form

Get a Kick Start for Kindergarten with the Summer Bridge Program

Pre-school students in the Middletown City School District who need assistance entering Kindergarten are eligible to participate in a fully-funded Kindergarten readiness program this summer in the homes of the students.

The Summer Bridge Kindergarten Reading Readiness Program arranges for a teacher to visit a child and parent at their residence one hour a week for seven weeks from June 4 to July 27. The program requires an adult to be present.

The Summer Bridge program is sponsored by the Middletown Community Foundation and implemented by   the Butler County Educational Services Center in coordination with the Middletown City School District.

During visits the teacher will discuss effective ways parents can prevent “summer slide” in order to improve the child’s readiness for Kindergarten. Both parent and child are expected to put the learning activities into practice between teacher visits. Activities can also be implemented during playtime.

Free materials will be provided to participants. They include books, puzzles, activities for reading and playing letter and number games, as well as containers for materials.

The Kindergarten readiness skills to be developed will be based upon a child’s current level in phonemic awareness (the ability to process sounds in words), sound/symbol association, handwriting skills, problem-solving skills as well as social, communication and math skills.

Families who complete all seven visits will receive school supplies for Kindergarten.

Information and sign-up sheets are available at the  Kindergarten Readiness Station at the MidPointe Library Children’s Department, 125 South Broad Street, Middletown. Parents should complete a form by May 18 and leave it with MidPointe Youth staff members who will forward it to BCESC.

A Spanish language form is also available.

 

Local History #tbt - Examining the Animals Found the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection

Working animals, particularly horses, played an important role in early 20th century Monroe, Ohio. That fact is illustrated in the latest collection of local historic photos on MidPointe Library’s Digital Archives and at its Middletown location.

Captured by Monroe resident and businessman Marion G. Warner (1861-1922), the collection’s remarkably sharp black-and-white images were derived from glass plate negatives. They depict families, individuals of all ages, working animals and pets, homes, businesses, buildings, churches and many outdoor scenes from the early 1900s. The collection was originally curated by and has been made available to MidPointe by the Monroe Historical Society, said Adam Wanter, MidPointe’s Digital and Special Collections archivist.

By inserting the term, “animals,” in the website’s search box, one immediately discerns the vital functions they performed in daily commerce and transportation. Some of Mr. Warner’s intriguing photos portray:

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Two horses pulling a load of what may be coal on a wagon for “Chas. Shafor Contractor and Dealer,” two horses pulling a large load of hay and an unknown driver on a wagon, a horse pulling a carriage for the Robert Earl Keever Bakery, and two horses pulling a large load of produce to the Butler County Canning Company.

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Mr. Warner’s keen eye also captured the towering size and the powerful build of draft horses in several photos of Gus Hinkle’s Percherons.

Additionally, Mr. Warner’s photos depict grazing horses and cattle, pet dogs and hunting dogs, sheep and a batch of fish. One set of fascinating photos shows an unknown man and his hunting dog standing in front of an impressive display of raccoon pelts.

racoon pelts.jpg

The Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection can be accessed at http://www.midpointedigitalarchives.org/digital/. Online visitors can click on the category of photo they wish to see : buildings, churches, homes and houses, people and families, business, street views, bridges, or they can insert a term in the search box.

At MidPointe Library Middletown, the Warner collection appears as a photographic exhibit on a 70-inch interactive touchscreen in its Local History and Genealogy Gallery. Enlarged prints of the photos are also displayed. The library is located at 125 S. Broad Street.

For access to actual photographs, contact the Monroe Historical Society : http://monroeohhistoricalsociety.org/.

Can you help?  If you can identify people or places in the Marion G. Warner Photograph Collection or would like to correct items that have been misidentified please contact the library at  https://www.midpointelibrary.org/page/contact-form